What’s behind the India-China border stand-off?

What’s behind the India-China border stand-off?

The two countries clashed in a border war in 1962 and conflicts are resolved in several areas, resulting in the time of tension over time.

Since this confrontation began last month, each side has strengthened its troops and called another to retreat.

That erupted when India opposes China’s attempt to expand a border road through a tray known as the Donglang Doklam in India and China.

The plateau, located at a junction between China, the Indian state of Sikkim and northeast of Bhutan, is currently being disputed between Beijing and Thimphu. India supports Bhutan’s claim.

The two countries clashed in a border war in 1962 and conflicts are resolved in several areas, resulting in the time of tension over time.

Since this confrontation began last month, each side has strengthened its troops and called another to retreat.

That erupted when India opposes China’s attempt to expand a border road through a tray known as the Donglang Doklam in India and China.

The plateau, located at a junction between China, the Indian state of Sikkim and northeast of Bhutan, is currently being disputed between Beijing and Thimphu. India supports Bhutan’s claim.

India and China rushed more troops into the border region, and the media reported that the two sides were in an “eyeball”.

China has also retaliated by preventing 57 Indian pilgrims visiting Lake Manas Sarovar in Tibet through Nathu Pass in Sikkim.

The lake is a healthy Hindu site, and there is a formal agreement among neighbors to allow devotees to visit.

Bhutan, meanwhile, has called on China to halt construction of the road, saying it contradicts an agreement between the two countries.

Military experts believe that India Sikkim is the only area in which India could give an offensive response to a Chinese incursion and the only stretch of the Himalayan border, where Indian troops land and a tactical advantage.

They have higher ground, and Chinese positions are pressed between India and Bhutan.

“The Chinese know this and they always try to undo our advantage there,” General Gaganjit Singh, who told the BBC, told the BBC that the troops at the border.

Last week, the Foreign Ministry said that the construction “would represent a significant change of the current situation with serious consequences for the security of India.”

Indian Defense Minister Arun Jaitley also warned that India in 2017 was not India of 1962 and the country was well within its right to defend its territorial integrity.

China reiterated its sovereignty over the region, saying that the road is in its territory and accused the Indian troops of “franchising.”

He said India would do well to remember its defeat in the 1962 war, noting Delhi that China is also more powerful than it was then.

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